mark hertsgaard

Independent Journalist & Author

mark

Canada’s Top TV Talk Show explores Generation Hot

Appearing on Canada’s top TV talk show, Mark speaks with host George Stroumboulopoulos about his “accidental crusade” to preserve a livable planet for Generation Hot and calls out President Obama for his lack of climate leadership. Watch it… Read more

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Scientific American Excerpts HOT’s Most Hopeful Story

For its excerpt from HOT, Scientific American chose the single most hopeful story in the book–the quiet, green miracle underway in West Africa, where farmers are adapting to climate change by growing (not planting) trees. Read it here:… Read more

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Mother Jones Excerpts HOT Success Stories

Mother Jones magazine (where I published the first cover story of my career, long ago) has ran two excerpts from HOT, focusing on the steps three local governments in the USA (Chicago, New York and King County, Washington) are taking to “avoid the unmanageable and manage the unavoidable.” Read more… Read more

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HOT Excerpt in The Nation Calls Out Climate Cranks

Actually, this article for The Nation was not an excerpt but an adaption of HOT’s message about the destructive role climate deniers have played–and why they must be stopped. Read more here:… Read more

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HOT Leads Vanity Fair’s Jan 2011 “Hot Type”

Here’s what Vanity Fair had to say about HOT: Happy freaking New Year. Welcome to the new normal. You know it, I know it–even the batshit-crazy climate change deniers know it: we’re toast. In Hot (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), Mark Hertsgaard predicts what “Generation Hot” can look forward to in the next 50 years, and it ain’t pretty: crops go extinct, vineyards turn from the noble art of wine-making to pimping raisins, the climate of Chicago comes to resemble that of Houston, and Houston officially becomes hell on… Read more

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Rave, “Starred” Review of HOT in Kirkus

HOT (reviewed on October 1, 2010) Climate change is well underway, writes Hertsgaard (The Eagle’s Shadow: Why America Fascinates and Infuriates the World, 2002, etc.), and we must begin to adapt to it even as we work to stop it. The author notes that we have entered the “second era of global warming.” Even if greenhouse-gas emissions ceased today, the consequences would continue for hundreds of years. Consequently, the author persuasively argues that we need to begin adapting to those changes, which does not mean that mitigating global warming is no longer important; in fact, it grows more urgent every day. Hertsgaard’s mantra is “avoid the unmanageable and manage the unavoidable.” Though the consequences of unchecked global warming would be impossible to adapt to, we… Read more

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Latest Book

HOT

By now, almost everyone knows what Edward Snowden did: leak top secret documents revealing that the US government was spying on hundreds of millions of people around the world. But if you want to know why Snowden did it, the way he did it, you need to know the stories of two other men.


The first is Thomas Drake, who blew the whistle on the very same surveillance ten years before Snowden did and got crushed. The other is The Third Man, a former senior Pentagon official who comes forward in this book for the first time to describe how his superiors repeatedly broke the law to punish Drake—and unwittingly taught Snowden how to evade their clutches.


Pick up your copy at:
Amazon.com | Barnes & Noble

About Mark

Independent journalist Mark Hertsgaard is the author of seven books that have been translated into sixteen languages, including Bravehearts: Whistle Blowing in the Age of Snowden; HOT: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth; and A Day in the Life: The Music and Artistry of the Beatles. He has reported from twenty-five countries about politics, culture and the environment for leading outlets, including The Guardian, Der Spiegel, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Time, Mother Jones, NPR, the BBC and The Nation, where is the environment correspondent. He lives in San Francisco.

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