mark hertsgaard

Independent Journalist & Author

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Who’s Afraid of Nuclear Power

by Mark HertsgaardLinkTV, Sep 01, 2006 INTRO: Welcome to Spotlight, Link TV’s weekly series of investigative reports from around the world. I’m Mark Hertsgaard in San Francisco. This episode the spotlight is on nuclear power and global warming. <!–more–> Global warming may be the best thing to happen to the nuclear industry in a long time. The industry has been on its back for more than thirty years now. The last order for a new reactor in the United States was in 1974. Five years later came a partial reactor meltdown at Three Mile Island. Seven years after that, a total meltdown at Chernobyl. But economics remains the biggest shortcoming. Nuclear power plants take so long to build and cost so much that Wall Street turned its back on them twenty years ago. Global… Read more

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The Panama Deception

by Mark HertsgaardLinkTV, Sep 01, 2006 INTRO: Welcome to Spotlight, Link TV’s weekly series of investigative reports from around the world. I’m Mark Hertsgaard in San Francisco, and this episode the spotlight is on President Bush’s invasion of Panama. <!–more–> No, not Geoge W. Bush. It was his father, George Bush senior, who ordered U.S. forces into Panama, back in 1989. But the parallels to his son’s invasion of Iraq in 2003 are too striking to ignore. In both cases, a small distant nation was attacked not because it had harmed the United States but because it was ruled by a nasty dictator Washington wanted out. But both Saddam Hussein in Iraq and Manuel Noriega in Panama were in fact long—time allies of the US government, even though US officials knew about… Read more

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Sex, Needles Rubles

by Mark HertsgaardLinkTV, Sep 01, 2006 INTRO: Welcome to Spotlight, Link TV’s weekly series of investigative reports from around the world. I’m Mark Hertsgaard in San Francisco, and this episode the spotlight is on AIDS in Russia. <!–more–> AIDS has become the deadliest epidemic in human history. Since its discovery in 1981, AIDS has killed 25 million people and infected 40 million more. Treatment has improved in recent years, but only the affluent enjoy access to it. Globally, according to the UN, only one in five HIV patients get the drugs they need. And experts warn that the worst is still to come, as the virus spreads from high-risk groups to general populations. In Africa alone, 100 million people are projected to die, dwarfing the death toll of the 1918 influenza… Read more

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Iraq’s Missing Billions

by Mark HertsgaardLinkTV, Sep 01, 2006 INTRO: Welcome to Spotlight, Link TV’s weekly series of investigative reports from around the world. I’m Mark Hertsgaard in San Francisco. <!–more–> In this episode the spotlight is on war profiteering in Iraq. Sad to say, war profiteering is nothing new. During World War II, Harry Truman, the Missouri Senator and future president, uncovered $160 billion of fraud by corporate contractors. In Iraq, the focus has been on Halliburton, the company vice president Cheney headed before joining the Bush administration. Before the war even started, Halliburton was granted a no-bid contract to rebuild Iraq’s oil infrastructure. The Pentagon expected no problems, an internal email said, because the issue had been, quote, coordinated… Read more

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Global Warming ⬠Bush’s Climate of Fear

by Mark HertsgaardLinkTV, Sep 01, 2006 INTRO: Welcome to Spotlight, Link TV’s weekly series of investigative reports from around the world. I’m Mark Hertsgaard in San Francisco. <!–more–> This episode the spotlight is on global warming censorship in the United States. 2006 may be remembered as the year the American public finally woke up to global warming. It was hard not to. Each week brought more news about how rising temperatures were melting glaciers, worsening storms and droughts and threatening the rise of sea levels. But there was also good news. California, which ranks as the world’s sixth biggest economy, passed a law requiring greenhouse gas emissions to decline 25 percent by 2020. Big business began changing too, as Wal-Mart, GE, Goldman Sachs and… Read more

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Australian Atomic Confessions

by Mark HertsgaardLinkTV, Sep 01, 2006 INTRO: Welcome to Spotlight, Link TV’s weekly series of investigative reports from around the world. I’m Mark Hertsgaard in San Francisco, and this episode the spotlight is on nuclear weapons in Australia. <!–more–> Australia has never possessed nuclear weapons, but its people and ecosystems have suffered their effects just the same. Uranium mining has polluted soil and water while sickening miners and nearby residents. The deadliest effects, however, came from 12 nuclear weapons that were deliberately exploded on Australian territory during the Cold War. The bombs were detonated between 1952 and 1963 (1958) by Great Britain, Australia’s former colonial ruler. The goal was to test the bomb’s effectiveness. The bombs were exploded… Read more

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Latest Book

HOT

By now, almost everyone knows what Edward Snowden did: leak top secret documents revealing that the US government was spying on hundreds of millions of people around the world. But if you want to know why Snowden did it, the way he did it, you need to know the stories of two other men.


The first is Thomas Drake, who blew the whistle on the very same surveillance ten years before Snowden did and got crushed. The other is The Third Man, a former senior Pentagon official who comes forward in this book for the first time to describe how his superiors repeatedly broke the law to punish Drake—and unwittingly taught Snowden how to evade their clutches.


Pick up your copy at:
Amazon.com | Barnes & Noble

About Mark

Independent journalist Mark Hertsgaard is the author of seven books that have been translated into sixteen languages, including Bravehearts: Whistle Blowing in the Age of Snowden; HOT: Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth; and A Day in the Life: The Music and Artistry of the Beatles. He has reported from twenty-five countries about politics, culture and the environment for leading outlets, including The Guardian, Der Spiegel, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Time, Mother Jones, NPR, the BBC and The Nation, where is the environment correspondent. He lives in San Francisco.

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